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S-4/A
CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS HOLDINGS CAPITAL CORP filed this Form S-4/A on 08/27/1999
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LOCAL FRANCHISE AUTHORITIES HAVE THE ABILITY TO IMPOSE ADDITIONAL REGULATORY
CONSTRAINTS ON OUR BUSINESS. THIS CAN FURTHER INCREASE OUR EXPENSES.
 
     In addition to the franchise document, cable authorities have also adopted
in some jurisdictions cable regulatory ordinances that further regulate the
operation of cable systems. This additional regulation increases our expenses in
operating our business. We cannot assure you that the local franchising
authorities will not impose new and more restrictive requirements.
 
   
     Local franchising authorities also have the power to reduce rates and order
refunds of basic service tier rates paid in the previous twelve-month period
determined to be in excess of the maximum permitted rates. Basic service tier
rates are the prices charged for basic programming services. As of June 30,
1999, we have refunded an aggregate amount of approximately $50,000 since our
inception. We may be required to refund additional amounts in the future.
    
 
OUR BUSINESS IS SUBJECT TO EXTENSIVE GOVERNMENTAL LEGISLATION AND REGULATION.
THE APPLICABLE LEGISLATION AND REGULATIONS, AND CHANGES TO THEM, COULD ADVERSELY
AFFECT OUR BUSINESS BY INCREASING OUR EXPENSES.
 
     Regulation of the cable industry has increased the administrative and
operational expenses and limited the revenues of cable systems. Cable operators
are subject to, among other things:
 
     - limited rate regulation;
 
     - requirements that, under specified circumstances, a cable system carry a
       local broadcast station or obtain consent to carry a local or distant
       broadcast station;
 
     - rules for franchise renewals and transfers; and
 
     - other requirements covering a variety of operational areas such as equal
       employment opportunity, technical standards and customer service
       requirements.
 
     Additionally, many aspects of such regulation are currently the subject of
judicial proceedings and administrative or legislative proposals. There are also
ongoing efforts to amend or expand the state and local regulation of some of our
cable systems, which may compound the regulatory risks we already face. We
expect further efforts, but cannot predict whether any of the states or
localities in which we now operate will expand regulation of our cable systems
in the future or how they will do so.
 
WE MAY BE REQUIRED TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO OUR NETWORKS TO OTHER INTERNET SERVICE
PROVIDERS. THIS COULD SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASE OUR COMPETITION AND ADVERSELY
AFFECT THE UPGRADE OF OUR SYSTEMS OR OUR ABILITY TO PROVIDE NEW PRODUCTS AND
SERVICES.
 
     There are proposals before the United States Congress and the Federal
Communications Commission to require all cable operators to make a portion of
their cable systems' bandwidth available to other Internet service providers,
such as telephone companies. Certain local franchising authorities are
considering or have already approved such "open access" requirements. A federal
district court in Portland, Oregon, recently upheld the legality of an open
access requirement. Recently, a number of companies, including telephone
companies and Internet service providers, have requested local authorities and
the Federal Communications Commission to require cable operators to provide
access to cable's broadband infrastructure, which allows cable to deliver a
multitude of channels and/or services, so that these companies may deliver
Internet services directly to customers over cable facilities. Broward County,
Florida recently granted open access to an
 
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